Cuddle Doll Sweater Pattern

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Hello everyone! We’ve had a few new knitters join us here at Bamboletta – there is something about a doll in a sweater that is extra sweet. We noticed that there are many patterns available for our larger dolls (see Knitting Directory) but nothing for the smaller, Cuddle Dolls. I asked Julia to make a pattern up and write it out so that we could share it with you all.  I can’t think of a nicer project to start off a Fall knitting season with! Happy Knitting! For the pattern, click  Bamboletta Cuddle Doll or Baby Sweater .

xo,
Christina and Julia

Kim Giovannini - September 4, 2014 - 3:30 pm

I love this! I’m going to give it a whirl, have been holding onto a cool green yarn that will work. whee!!

Julia - September 8, 2014 - 3:55 pm

I love this! But I don’t knit any chance you’ll have some in an upload soon. Pink would be perfect 😉

Sarah - November 15, 2014 - 8:48 pm

How lovely! Thanks so much for sharing!

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Doll Types (Part Two)

I did a Doll Type Blog post about a year or so ago but, since then, we have added in a few more doll types. We’ve been asked what the difference is between them all so I thought I’d explain.

Classic Doll

This was the first style of doll I made over 10 years ago! This body type is based on traditional German dollmaking patterns (which is what the Waldorf Dolls are based on). The body is sewn with cotton for it’s ‘skin’ (which comes in all the way from the Netherlands – specially milled for dollmaking) and then the doll is stuffed with wool. It’s luscious hair is made with wool, mohair and alpaca yarns and can be styled in many different ways (here’s our YouTube channel for hair styling ideas) The doll is stuffed quite firmly and the limbs don’t ‘bend’ at first, over time the arms and legs loosen up so the doll can eventually sit but she’ll always be ‘hug ready’!  She stands 15 inches tall and is good for 3 and up but this age range is debatable. Some wee kids LOVE the big dolls, the heft of it can be very comforting. These dolls take us about 10 – 12 hours to make. They come with underpants, a super cute outfit and shoes.  They cost $240 – $260 (depending on extra’s in hair or outfit).

Little Buddy

So, this is a teenier version of the Classic Doll measuring about 10″ tall.  Made with all natural materials and all that good stuff. This is a traditional Waldorf style doll with the body shape – arms outstretched for lots of hugs. This doll seems to be good for little ones, ages 1.5 – 2 ish, or for kids that love little things! These dolls take us about 6 hours to do from start to finish. They come with a simple outfit and underpants but no shoes. They cost $130.

Sitting Friend

This doll was created for children (and their moms) that wanted a softer, more bendable doll. They measure 15″ tall (and fit the Classic Doll clothing). We developed this pattern to have movable limbs, it’s perfect for tea parties.  These dolls also have very cute feet (unlike our Classic and Little Buddy dolls who have the rounded foot). This doll would be good for ages 3 and up, but, again, it’s a personal preference for the child. Like the other dolls, the skin is made with that fantastic cotton ‘skin’ and stuffed with wool. Did you know that wool is absolutely amazing for children? It’s naturally antibacterial, warms to the touch and absorbs scent so the doll smells like ‘home’.  These dolls take us between 10 – 12 hours to create. They come with underpants, a super cute outfit and shoes. They cost $240 – $260 depending on the outfit and hair.

Cuddle Doll

This doll was inspired by our seamstress Nicki’s childhood doll Pippi. We loved Pippi because of her size and her long-ish floppy legs. So, we made a Bamboletta version.  She’s a bit like a small version of our Sitting Doll but there are some differences. She stands 13″ tall, is ‘thinner’ then our regular dolls and has longer legs with feet! She is made with the same materials as all the other dolls. I think ages 2 and up would be good ,but, again, totally subjective. This doll takes about 7 – 8 hours to make. She comes with an outfit (2 piece), underpants and crocheted or felt shoes. They cost $155.

Folk Dolls

Ah, the Folk Dolls. These are my personal favorite. We wanted a taller doll and I sort of made this doll to be like an homage to dolls of my past. More traditional in the clothing, hand knit sweaters and dimpled ankles, knees and elbows. The arms on these are differnent as they hang down as opposed to outstretched like the rest of the dolls. Their limbs are very moveable and they are so nice to pick up. These dolls are 18″ tall . The more I am around them the more I think they are like an adult’s doll. Not that little ones can’t play with them, but these seem to have something about them that makes me think this. They are made with the same goodness and care as our other dolls and take about 12 hours to make. Ages 3 and up. $295.

Piccolina Dolls

These sweet wee dolls measure 9″ tall and are a condensed version of the Cuddle Doll. Currently these dolls are only available in our store or at markets. We only make a few of them at a time so it’s easier for us to sell them this way. Wool and natural materials, of course. $95

Baby Dolls

You can’t help but sigh a little when you pick up one of these dolls. They are SO sweet, from the curve of their little backside to the sweet little cap of hair – love through and through. Made with all natural materials these dolls are very slightly weighted with Rose Quartz pebbles. I chose this because of the calming properties this stone is said to have. The dolls have a little cap of hair, a diaper, sleeper, hat and sweet little swaddling blanket to cuddle with. Ages 1.5 and up.

So, there they all are! I hope this has been helpful to you. One thing I do recommend for people with small children is that they tie the long hair back or braid it until the child is ready to play ‘hairdresser’. It’s made with natural materials and some shedding is to be expected but this will stop as the yarns age a bit and will ‘felt up’ a little. It’s kind of like natural hair when it’s freshly washed and is all fluffy, it takes a bit of time for your hair to calm down. Natural dolls have a feel of their own and will age with your child and hopefully will be passed along to their child! I feel VERY strongly about using natural materials hence the price point (as well as the labour put in between all of us sewing mama’s!). If you are interested in learning more about the philosophy and use of natural materials, I wrote a blog post here about it.

Thank you so much!
Christina

Geneva - January 8, 2015 - 6:32 pm

Beautiful. Love these dolls!

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Workshop September 13th

We are holding another Piccolina workshop at the studio on September 13th. We had one a few months back and had such a great time, it was amazing to see our participants bring their dolls to life! We will work on assembling a doll, so this isn’t a workshop where you will be learning how to make a head or stuff, all that is done for you. Here we will be sewing the doll together, putting on the hair and then sewing on the face. I’m really hoping to some how take this workshop on the road somehow .. I’m going to try to figure out a Vancouver date by the end of the year.

So, the details, it’s on Saturday the 13th from 10-5. We will provide lunch and snacks and tea (of course!). The workshop includes all your materials and when you finish your doll you get to choose an outfit for her. Myself, Brandi and Shauna will be there with helping hands, so please don’t worry if you don’t have any sewing skills, you will be just fine!

We only have a few spots left and you can register HERE. Hope to see you there!

xo
Christina

Amy - August 22, 2014 - 12:06 pm

Boo! Too bad I live over 2000 miles away. I would love to go to a workshop like this. It looks great! I hope everyone who attends the September 13th one has a great time!

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Busy Hands

We had some pictures taken last fall by the lovely Devon Gillott. Hands at work, always busy at the Bamboletta studio.

I hope everyone is keeping well. I’m shifting some stuff at the studio so that I will have more time to blog and I am really looking forward to it. I miss writing and chatting on here. It crazy how fast time goes by!

Talk soon!
Christina

Courtney Scaggs - August 15, 2014 - 9:04 am

Will you sweet ladies ever put out clothes patterns? Thanks xoxo

admin - August 15, 2014 - 9:24 am

We are working on it 🙂

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Knitting Directory

This is my Nonna, she is my original doll sweater knitter. Her knitting slowed down for a while but she is back in action, something which she is really happy about.

We get the most lovely emails from people telling us about how our dolls have inspired them to pick up the needles and knit for their dolls or dust off the sewing machine and start making some outfits. Being a bit of a spark for someone’s creativity makes me  incredibly happy and honored.  I believe we need creativity in our lives, as much as air and food and water. To me, creativity connects us into something – that timeless bliss – be it when you sew, or knit, or give your fridge a really good clean (I did this today – so satisfying!). Creativity is such a loaded word – people often connect it with something artsy – but I really think it’s anytime you are in the ‘zone’.

Any ways, enough of my musings. I recently found out about this whole wide world of knitters for doll stuff – it’s amazing! I did a post asking people on Facebook for their patterns and knit goodies so that I could comply a directory of sorts. We get asked from customers where they can find patterns so this is an easy place to point them.

Some of these are free, others are paid for. I’ll tell you another thing that makes me happy – that there are people out there creating income for themselves by selling stuff for our dolls. Bamboletta is  like a flower or something that sends off thousands of seeds and ,to me, blooms with creativity.
*If you knit and have patterns available/knitted goodies for sale please email me at christina@bamboletta.com and I will add you in!*

First off, Brandy Fortune’s book!

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Michelle Chang

Shannon Talbott

Crabapples Boutique

Deborah Minner

Linsay Cocker

DalaiMama

H H Crafts

Alicia Wilson

Mini Me Woolies

Lori Campbell

Muriela

Karyn Gragg

Brandy Fortune

Winterludes

Korin Bourdo

Joanna Johnson

Georgie Hallam

Fig and Me

Tansy Dolls

Avi and Tavi

Ninny Noodle Noo

Luletti

Tafferty Designs

Laura Van Roo

BlackberryFaerie

EvelynClark

TurtlekeeperDesigns

Flora and Finn

Clara’s Little Boutique

So, this should keep you busy for a while! Next Directory I’ll create is a Doll Clothing pattern one.

Happy Knitting Everyone!
xo,
Christina

[…] that is extra sweet. We noticed that there are many patterns available for our larger dolls (see Knitting Directory) but nothing for the smaller, Cuddle Dolls. I asked Julia to make a pattern up and write it out so […]

Clara's Little Boutique - September 30, 2014 - 4:59 pm

Hello

We Knit and Crochet Doll Sweaters and are interested in being listed on your site.
Our outfits fit Bamboletta Dolls as well as other types of dolls.

We fell in love with the Bamboletta Dolls, they are so darling and reminded us of our childhood and all our friends who had the dolls wanted clothes – so we just started sewing and knitting, them and we then established our ETSY shop and have had it for over a year and just love making the clothes.

We believe this is a wonderful Marketing Tool, great Customer Service and a way to give those who purchase dolls another avenue for outfits. And of course keeps everyone buying the lovely dolls!

We appreciate this opportunity. Please contact us if you have any questions

Thank you

Chrissy and Jeannette

http://www.etsy.com/shop/claraslittleboutique

Melinda - April 17, 2015 - 1:10 pm

Can I just say that I love that your Nonna knits Portuguese style? A friend’s grandmother was going to teach me that way of tensioning and ended up passing away before I could learn…made me think of dear Vovo!

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