The Adventures of Lucy(ita) – Part 11

Ack! The adventures are a day late, I am so sorry. I’ve been at the computer a lot trying to upload stuff on to the new shop and sewing like mad to get stock ready. Busy.

Since this is Lucita’s first time in Guatemala and everything is such a new experience, she thought it might be interesting to share some of her thoughts and impressions from the last 7 weeks here.

 

 lucyheatherdora.jpg

Things that take getting used to…

 

Toilet paper is put in trash cans rather than flushed.

Sunset is at about 6pm all year long!

This dry season produces SO much dust. It’s everywhere all the time!

The cobblestone roads are tricky to walk on.

There are many languages besides Spanish and they all sound very different!

Erupting volcanoes and rumbling earthquakes are common here. Minimal but always the possibility of more!

Security guards with guns at many stores and all banks.

Children working to help support their families.

The poverty. 

Helicopters flying overhead. 

The stories of violence in the newspapers. Always with photos! 

Mothers begging with their children in the street.

Gold rimmed teeth as a fashion statement.

Skinny unwell dogs living in the streets.

Shower water is heated at the head by an electrical device, fondly called “The Widow Maker”

Cold water is the only option to wash one’s hands.

 

 

sweetguatemalankids.jpg

 

Things to love about being here…

 

Mangos. Yum! And Mango season is fast approaching.

Women carrying their babies on their backs everywhere they go.

The sweet faces of the children.

The vast array of colours everywhere.

The beautiful embroidery on the women’s clothing.

The smiles of the people.

The ancient ruins. 

Sunshine every day!

Fountains in all the parks.

Blue skies and puffy white clouds.

Guatemalan coffee!

Meeting wonderful people that are working to make a difference for those in need.

The incredible sight of volcanoes. 

Flowers always in bloom.

Fresh fruits and vegetables from the busy and chaotic markets.

Dogs are welcome almost everywhere.

Sheri - March 30, 2009 - 12:53 pm

We have spent 2 weeks in Guatemala while adopting our daughter in 2007. I so agree with your list and would add….seeing people buying goat milk in the middle of the street straight from the goat and serving ketchup with every food. Seeing the women dress in handmade tradional clothing and fresh tortillas!!! I also read that you are starting an orphanage. We have a group here at home that are trying to do the same thing. We are in the beginning stages trying to gather information for Guatemala and Honduras. We love the way you have designed the homes with the nannies living in the homes like a huge family. We also are wanting to make sure that our orphanage can sustain itself with its own food. How long have you been working on your orphanage project?

Cate - March 30, 2009 - 1:17 pm

Oh That was a beautiful post. So easy to read and imagine. I could almost hear the dogs barking and the children playing. The second half balanced the first half so well. I can’t imagine how confronting this place could be.

Leah Killian - March 30, 2009 - 9:01 pm

wow!

CanCan (Mom Most Traveled) - March 31, 2009 - 8:52 am

When I was in China we used to use a wastebasket for our used TP as well. I really didn’t like it! :)

My son has enjoyed Lucy’s adventures.

Caci (Homespun Momma) - March 31, 2009 - 9:36 am

It sound like such a wonderful place with so many terrible things happening. I love the lists!

Heather - March 31, 2009 - 10:38 am

Yeah, the toilet paper thing definitely takes some getting used to. So glad your son is enjoying Lucy’s adventures. She’s about to embark on her first excursion outside of Antigua. We’re off to visit a project in the mountains near Huehuetenango tomorrow. Will be back on Sunday in time to share her time away!

Nicole - April 1, 2009 - 12:19 pm

How interesting! Thanks for sharing this! : )

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