CPSIA Update

I thought I’d write a little update on where Bamboletta stands on the CPSIA issue. It’s all so confusing and overwhelming to be honest. I just want to make sure that I can ship dolls across the border without any hassle. So, this is what I’ve come up with so far.

Although there were recommendations made that wool, cotton be exempt from the law – reading the recommendations , and not relying on Bloomberg.com (my bad, I just saw the cotton and wool!) indicates that it is only undyed cotton and wool that would be exempt. So, what I personally am doing is gathering up all my materials – every thread, every embroidery floss, beeswax (cheek colour), fabrics, wool – you name it – and sending it to a lab on Friday to undergo testing that will put me in compliance with the law.  It will not be illegal to buy a Bamboletta Doll.

This is maddening, but it is the law. There is no lead in wool, cotton or any of the fabrics I use – it would be impossible. I use 100% natural fibres in all that I do (aside from my thread – polyester – it just works better).  A good portion of my business comes from the USA and the last thing I would want to happen is have a doll seized at the boarder. This business is our livelihood and we just can’t take the chance of the $100,000 fine. If I didn’t comply, I wouldn’t think realistically anything would happen to me – they wouldn’t find lead in any of my dolls BUT if I don’t test then I’d be breaking the law. So, we have to put the testing on the Visa and then it’s done with. It’s good information to have and I don’t have to stress about it. I plan on sending a few of Bens toys over to the lab for testing that I’m iffy about.

This whole thing makes me sad, really, really sad for crafters and artists in the US. I understand and totally agree that there has to be some form of protection for our children against unsafe lead levels. But, there has to be a way that WAHM’s can afford testing or use testing done by manufactures (fabric manufactures for example) to prove that their products are safe. I believe that the law will change – but it’s already the end of the month and things don’t look like they are moving.

So, please if you haven’t already, have a look at this and write to your congresspeople/ senators/ etc. It will be a sad world without handmade childrens things.

Naomi - January 29, 2009 - 7:37 am

What a total nightmare. I can’t imagine how this is helping our children…

admin - January 29, 2009 - 9:55 am

if supplier issued certificates were acceptable as a form of compliance I think that would be the saving grace for lots of us. if you go and buy some 100% cotton fabric at walmart (ugh) and make Roo a dress then you are perfectly within your rights and she has a cute , cotton dress – as it stands now the fabric manufacturer does not have to test – so that fabric could be a lead laden biohazard (!?)- but if a WAHM with an etsy shop were to make the same dress with the same fabric then it’s illegal. I think the testing should be done at a supplier level – then there is less risk of dangerous things to get through. with the testing results coming back it’s mostly sparkly bits, pearlized buttons, zippers, snaps, and puffy transfers on tshirts that are coming back with high lead – think Hanna Montana at Walmart. no offence to the HM of course :)

Leanna - January 29, 2009 - 10:31 am

This whole thing is very hard to swallow, I agree about testing at the suplier level, and although I have no idea how “they” would enforce I am not taking a chance either, but unfortunatly I can’t afford the testing so my dolls will be for Canada only :( I am scared they are going to attack the etsy sellers like gangbusters on the 10th, so I am going to change my shipping info before that. I am so very glad that you are doing the testing, your dolls are so fab. and not having them available would be such a shame.

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*

Facebook sharing is caring!
R e c e n t   p o s t s
A r c h i v e s